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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
the timelines regarding iran? in covering the pentagon and foreign policy. elizabeth, you know we have a different u.s. officials have a different notion of when we reach that danger point. the testimony last week was that the ayatollah has still not made the political decision to proceed with nuclear weapons. there's not that same sense at all in israel. >> i feel like i've been talking about this for years. the different timelines. but yes, there's still a different timeline that the u.s., i think the last thing the president said was about a year, israel thinks it's sooner than that. the reality is that israel is going to be in a very difficult position to do a strike itself. we've been through that many times it doesn't have the same capabilities the united states does and the united states is it going to wait until the last possible minute there was a lot of fighting last fall as you remember, about the president not being strong enough, against on iran. that has died down. there's a new israeli government and it's a little bit more moderate. so we're still in the same place. >> a
: julie senator graham says this is quote, an exhibit a of a failed foreign policy and this is why the president allegedly doesn't want the people to come forward. bin laden is on the run, and al-qaeda is alive and well and benghazi, and how the people were allegedly begging for help. and we know that about the ambassador and apparently these people would back up-- >> and senator graham has to create the anti-obama to-- that's not what it's about at all. >> i would caution you and say this, senator graham can allege what it wants and white house can allege what it wants. the more lessons drawn from this the better. the more testimony from congress is the better. and if it's done privately without jeopardizing the covert operatives i'm for it. instead of trotting out on the sunday talk shows where senator graham is trying to burnish his bona fides, as opposed to going out there and-- >> how much more can he do? >> he can't prove this? >> senator graham is a whistle blower. >> he can't proof anything. >> he's to get what he's entitled to. the president doesn't seem to honor or respec
and director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. and david makovsky is the director of the project on the middle east peace process at the washington institute for near east policy. welcome to both of you. martin, let me start with you. as the president goes to israel, what will he find in general terms in this new government? what do we know or not know? >> well, it's only a couple of days old. so it's a very hard to tell exactly what it's going to shape up to. what we have is right wing party with a shift within the likud further in the right in terms of its composition. we have a large center party, lapid, this new rising star. then to his left is tzipi livni who was the only candidate to campaign on the two-state solution. he only got 56. >> brown: somehow they all worked together or were supposed to work together. >> there's a special glue on the seats of israeli cabinet chairs which kind of keep them stuck there for a while at least. they have to respond to their constituency. that is the key point here. their constituents wants them to focus on
of the president's bigger failures on foreign policy of the first term in office. though it's a failure that he didn't necessarily have a lot of control over. at the beginning of his first term, the president declared with great fanfare he wouldn't follow the lead of his predecessors presidents clinton and bush and wait until a second term to push for middle east peace. >> we're not going to wait until the end of my administration to deal with palestinian and israeli peace. we're going to start now. >> instead, not only did the peace process go nowhere, it's actually taken a step back. when the president sets off for israel on tuesday, he travels with very low expectations. that's probably the bit of good news. from the outset the president pressed israel hard on what a two-state solution would look like. >> israelis must acknowledge that just as israel's right to exist cannot be denied, neither can palestine's. the united states does not accept the legitimacy of continued israeli settlements. it is time for these settlements to stop. >> president obama's relationship with israeli prime ministe
armed services committee. chairman carl levin, democrat of michigan told foreign policy.com's josh rogan he wants to see the u.s. help establish a no-fly zone over syria. lindsey graham republican senator from south carolina called for u.s. boots on the ground. quote we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapon sites either in conjunction with our partners or if nothing else by ourselves. graham told josh rogan. you have got to get on the ground. i don't care what it takes. the white house held firm today saying its policy for now is that it will not be providing any lethal aid to the rebels. shep? >> shepard: james rosen at the white house tonight. well, a mixed day on wall street as investors around the world obviously eyed the island nation of cyprus where lawmakers rejected a controversial plan to qualify for a bailout. the dow made up for early losses and closed up but just four points. the nasdaq fell 8 the s&p off close to four. meantime markets in europe dropped over fears that the government of cyprus would tap into people's savings accounts. just reach in and get money
funding. the same way democrats have often done on some foreign policy issues in the past with a republican president. stop the money is how you stop the law. but i think it's going to be a you have tough thing to do. it's, again, once the program gets in place, it's hard to take it back. and one of these things the governors have done when they let the federal government set up the system is that takes the states out of having any ability to set up the exchange themself. i mean, it gives the state less say and the federal government more say. that's going to be a tough thing for the republicans. you know, republicans want more say in the states. so even in times of posing obamacare, they're actually giving more power to the federal government. it's very complicated issue. of. jon: well, it is complicated, and it's three years old, and most of its provisions really haven't kicked in yet. that's what remains to be seen, how, you know, people adjust to it as they actually have to sign on for this thing. joe trippi -- >> that's right. jon: -- we'll continue to keep a watch on
at this podium and talk about foreign policy issues but i'm glad to be here today to talk about this diplomatic campaign in pakistan and afghanistan. i want to say one of the good things about speaking to a washington audience, when jessica goes through the jobs you've had everyone goes uh-huh, uh-huh. >> i was somewhere speaking and someone said here is ambassador grossman. i want to say what a pleasure it is to see so many people here in the audience who i have had the great benefit of learning from for many years. without drawing any distinctions i hope you'll allow me three. i started my career in pakistan junior to 1979 as a officer and howy was a boss of mine. i see ambassador hugh sane as the first a foreign diplomat i ever had to meet and do business with. i'm glad to see you. simon henderson was a stringer for a number of very important pub bli indications then and he taught me a lot of about journalism. i know there are others this in this room as well. those three take me back to 1979.1978 and we'll see what you say when this is over. what i want to do stod take up the offer that i
. it was a name juror foreign policy objective of the obama administration when he came in. special envoy grossman who took mr. holbrooke's place when he passed away had a principle mission to do that but those negotiations broke down because one, the karzai government was not involved, pakistan was not involved and the various influential groups inside afghanistan were also not involved. the fact that karzai is beginning the initiative i don't see anything wrong with that. i think it's the beginning of a very long process which is also troubled by the opposition that the factions have and the strong views. i mean people in afghanistan do not want the taliban to take control of any of the population inside of afghanistan after a negotiated settlement to be sure. jenna: you mentioned the factions though. it was interesting doing a little research for this segment i realize the state department does not list the taliban as a terrorist organization. there are different taliban-related groups, for example, a taliban, i want to call it a sector, a taliban group in pakistan that is listed as a terrorist
of all, they don't like covering foreign policy stories anymore. most of the bureaus have shut down around the world. they rely on stringers. we've got a lot of propaganda coming into the american media, and i think that while the ten-year anniversary is important, it's more important for the media to look into the fact that this isn't just about nation-states or any one leader. this is about a virus, radical islam, that continues to threaten not only the middle east, but much of the rest of the world. that's the real story that needs to continue to be written, in my view. jon: let me read for you part of the piece that appeared this morning, marvin, in "the new york post" which is owned by the parent corporation of this network. they write: jon: is this, in fact, a bit of a repeat of what we accomplished in world war ii? >> no, it is not a repeat, unfortunately. at the end of world war ii, the u.s. made major efforts, put in an enormous amount of money to help japan and germany change politically, change economically, and both nations did that. in iraq what we are seeing is not the
of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and tweets. "washington journal" every morning live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> said they hired a very expensive carriage. elizabeth monroe dressed herself in her best and went to the prison where she was being held. she met with madame lafayette and basically made her case public one. some stories say, the next day, she was released. it was not the next day. it was a couple of months. it's pretty much kept her from going to the guillotine. >> in some ways, she has her own cause. she works with the washington aquino orphan asylum. in some sense, that is somewhat more and -- modern. she does work politics in her parlor. >> our conversation with historians on elizabeth monroe catherine adams. it is now available on our web site. >> other generations are asking, how do we adapt? how do we move in this fast- paced world? millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we grew up. it has brought a sense of ease and adaptability. it has brought us the ability to be resilient to the economic cr
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)